Dove Allouche, Funghi, 2017

Dove Allouche, Penicillium purpurascens myc 34 CZ #5, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Fusarium culmorum myc 21 MA #16, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Aspergillus chevalieri (Eurotium) myc 3 MA #24, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Aspergillus chevalieri (Eurotium) myc 3 MA #24, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Aspergillus ustus myc 10 MA #32, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Aspergillus ustus myc 10 MA #32, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Verticillium tennerum myc 44 MA #39, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.

Dove Allouche, Funghi, 2017

Photolithograph and hand-blown crown glass
48 x 48 cm (19 x 19 inches)
Unique
With the series Funghi, Dove Allouche refocused on the living realm, working with species of spores that predate man. Allouche collected samples of the spores from several museums’ storage facilities, cultivated each one to observe their morphologies, as they spread and grew in widening circles. At a certain point in their development, he photographed them and printed them as lithographs.The act of blowing the spores into the petri dish with a glass pipette is finally echoed in the process of blowing the colored crown glass the artist makes to overlay each image. The circular sheets vary in color, opacity, and surface depth, at times obscuring and elsewhere highlighting the images of the spores.