Dove Allouche, Sunflowers, 2018

Dove Allouche, Sunflower_35, 2017–2018

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium
Argent pur et étain sur papier Cibachrome non exposé à la lumière contrecollé sur aluminium
180 x 126 cm, framed / encadré 196,4 x 143,7 x 5 cm
Unique

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium
180 x 126 cm, framed 197 x 144 x 5 cm
127 x 130 cm, framed 143 x 147 x 5 cm
Unique

The tension between light and darkness and the fragility of the image is explored in Allouche’s Sun ower series. Borrowing the technique of mirror making, the artist coated Cibachrome paper with layers of tin and silver. This process is completed in the dark, similar to the artist’s ambrotypes of caves, and the coating inevitably varies across the surface of each work. When the sheet is brought out of the dark room, light exposes the photographic paper in different degrees, turning brown sections that received less tin and silver and revealing traces of the artists’ movements as he applied the metals to the paper. The result is neither an image that records the world nor a mirror that reflects it.

Dove Allouche, Sunflower_34, 2017–2018

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium
180 x 126 cm, framed 197 x 144 x 5 cm
Unique

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium
180 x 126 cm, framed 197 x 144 x 5 cm
127 x 130 cm, framed 143 x 147 x 5 cm
Unique

The tension between light and darkness and the fragility of the image is explored in Allouche’s Sun ower series. Borrowing the technique of mirror making, the artist coated Cibachrome paper with layers of tin and silver. This process is completed in the dark, similar to the artist’s ambrotypes of caves, and the coating inevitably varies across the surface of each work. When the sheet is brought out of the dark room, light exposes the photographic paper in different degrees, turning brown sections that received less tin and silver and revealing traces of the artists’ movements as he applied the metals to the paper. The result is neither an image that records the world nor a mirror that reflects it.

Dove Allouche, Sunflower_2, 2018

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium

180 x 126 cm, framed 197 x 144 x 5 cm
Unique

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium
180 x 126 cm, framed 197 x 144 x 5 cm
127 x 130 cm, framed 143 x 147 x 5 cm
Unique

The tension between light and darkness and the fragility of the image is explored in Allouche’s Sun ower series. Borrowing the technique of mirror making, the artist coated Cibachrome paper with layers of tin and silver. This process is completed in the dark, similar to the artist’s ambrotypes of caves, and the coating inevitably varies across the surface of each work. When the sheet is brought out of the dark room, light exposes the photographic paper in different degrees, turning brown sections that received less tin and silver and revealing traces of the artists’ movements as he applied the metals to the paper. The result is neither an image that records the world nor a mirror that reflects it.

Dove Allouche, Sunflower_45, 2018

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium.

127 x 130 cm, framed 143 x 147 x 5 cm
Unique

Pure silver and tin base on unexposed Cibachrome paper mounted on aluminium
180 x 126 cm, framed 197 x 144 x 5 cm
127 x 130 cm, framed 143 x 147 x 5 cm
Unique

The tension between light and darkness and the fragility of the image is explored in Allouche’s Sun ower series. Borrowing the technique of mirror making, the artist coated Cibachrome paper with layers of tin and silver. This process is completed in the dark, similar to the artist’s ambrotypes of caves, and the coating inevitably varies across the surface of each work. When the sheet is brought out of the dark room, light exposes the photographic paper in different degrees, turning brown sections that received less tin and silver and revealing traces of the artists’ movements as he applied the metals to the paper. The result is neither an image that records the world nor a mirror that reflects it.