Mark Geffriaud, Sleeper #2, 2015

Mark Geffriaud, Sleeper #2, 2015

Enlarger photo bulb, electric cable, lens holder in steel, lens, steel screen, filter UV photo, carbon 14
203 x 24,5 x 20 cm
Unique

‘Sleeper #2’ is a transformative portrait of a decayed and orphaned section of track from the NYC High Line, located on the roof of what is now Westbeth since 1934, when elevated trains ran directly through the building. Taking a miniscule sample of wood from one of the railroad ties, Geffriaud arranged for its conversion into a small amount of graphite by a radiocarbon dating lab. Serving as a non-static time capsule, the graphite will continually evolve in the future as a material and conceptual byproduct of the building.

Mark Geffriaud, Sleeper #2, 2015

Enlarger photo bulb, electric cable, lens holder in steel, lens, steel screen, filter UV photo, carbon 14
203 x 24,5 x 20 cm
Unique

‘Sleeper #2’ is a transformative portrait of a decayed and orphaned section of track from the NYC High Line, located on the roof of what is now Westbeth since 1934, when elevated trains ran directly through the building. Taking a miniscule sample of wood from one of the railroad ties, Geffriaud arranged for its conversion into a small amount of graphite by a radiocarbon dating lab. Serving as a non-static time capsule, the graphite will continually evolve in the future as a material and conceptual byproduct of the building.

Mark Geffriaud, Sleeper #2, 2015

Enlarger photo bulb, electric cable, lens holder in steel, lens, steel screen, filter UV photo, carbon 14
203 x 24,5 x 20 cm
Unique

‘Sleeper #2’ is a transformative portrait of a decayed and orphaned section of track from the NYC High Line, located on the roof of what is now Westbeth since 1934, when elevated trains ran directly through the building. Taking a miniscule sample of wood from one of the railroad ties, Geffriaud arranged for its conversion into a small amount of graphite by a radiocarbon dating lab. Serving as a non-static time capsule, the graphite will continually evolve in the future as a material and conceptual byproduct of the building.