Mac Adams, Post Modern Tragedies, 1986–2013

Mac Adams, Kettle, 1987

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed 73 x 90,5 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, Bombing, 1986

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed 127 x 112 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, Colander, 2013

Pigmented print on archival paper, framed 76 x 102 cm, framed 79 x 107 x 4 cm Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)
Signed, dated and numbered at the back

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, Lamp II, The Photographer Model, 1986

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed 195,5 x 106,6 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, The Party, 2009

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed 165 x 110 cm
Edition of 5 (+ 1 A.P.)

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, Boston Tea Party, 1988

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed 101,6 x 127 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, Urn, 1989

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed
100 x 66 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams

Mac Adams, Lamp I, 1988

Color photograph, chromogenic print, framed 101,6 x 76 cm, framed 108 x 85 x 3,5 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)
Signed, dated and numbered at the back

“In the early part of the 1980’s I began a series of images titled Post Modern Tragedies.
These works were in part a response to what I saw happening under Thatcher/Reagan economic policies in the UK and the USA. I am not a documentary photographer, however I wanted to see if I could construct a situation that reflected the political conditions and contradictions of the times. It was also a response to the postmodern discourse of the 80’s.
I believe it was Jean-Francois Lyotard who coined the term techno-schizophrenia in his 1979 book ‘The Post modern Condition’. I interpreted this as a disjunction between the traditional notions of form in harmony with content, for example, Philip Johnson’s AT&T building in New York City, a collection of architectural styles of the past outside, containing state of the art electronic telecommunications inside.
I took this idea of combining visual contradictions and began making these hybrid collisions between social trage- dies and designer utensils. The chromed mirrored objects were photographed on seamless paper like conventional utopian adverts implying a neutral space existing only in the viewers desire to possess. However reflected on the surfaces were violent unsettling situations, interrogations, shooting, etc. Situations that completely contradicted the forms with their perfect metallic skins”.
Mac Adams