Mac Adams, Mysteries, 1974–1981

Mac Adams, The Butterfly, 1977

Diptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 75 x 91 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Fury, 1976

Diptych, B&W photograph, framed
100 x 76 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Across the Park, 1975

Diptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 84,4 x 77,4 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Bicycle, 1977

B&W photograph, silver print, framed 66 x 90 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Cardiff Bus Stop, 1975

Diptych of B&W photograph, silver print, framed 74,5 x 90 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, The Whisper, 1976–1977

Diptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 93 x 102 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Still life with Mickey, 1977

B&W photograph, silver print, framed 101,5 x 72 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Orian, 1980

Diptych of B&W photograph, silver print, framed 72 x 72,9 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Port Authority, 1975

Diptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 102 x 93 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Shoes, 1976

Triptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 76 x 101 cm each
Edition 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Sofa, 1979

Diptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 100 x 69 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Still life with Guernica, 1977

B&W photograph, silver print, framed 95 x 68 cm
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Tennis, 1976

Diptych of B&W photograph, silver print, framed 80 x 68 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, The Voyeur, 1974

Triptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed, 76 x 101 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, The Witness, 1977

Diptych of B&W photograph, silver print, framed 71,4 x 101,6 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse

Mac Adams, Toots, 1977

Diptych, B&W photograph, silver print, framed 76,5 x 92 cm each
Edition of 3 (+ 1 A.P.)

With his Mysteries series of photographic diptychs from the 70’s showing the tragic moment either before or after an act of violence or crime, Mac Adams introduced an element of uncertainty. By virtue of his status as a false witness, its capacity to gather clues, but also because of the uncanniness it produces, photography was the ideal candidate to show crime and perhaps, too, its author and victim. Mac Adams invites the viewer to investigate, placing before them the protagonists, the murder weapon and the scene. Yet the photographic image seems utterly incapable of representing a straightforward truth. it may deliver information, but interpretation is another matter altogether. “The detective is constantly trying to capture, master and understand the dark and irrational creative side of a personality. I think that in the end all serious art becomes self examination and a kind of self-medication in an increasingly fragmented and alienated world”. Whereas the parable of the investigation is used as a mode of operation for making and reading photography, the diffracted image of a shattered mirror -simultaneously distancing and bringing closer the idea of death- is a metaphor for the meanders of the unconscious.
Pascal Beausse