Elina Brotherus, Meaningless Work, 2016

Elina Brotherus, Artist as Lamp, 2019

From the series Meaningless Work
Pigment ink print on barytha paper from digital original mounted on aluminium and framed
90 x 120 cm
Edition of 6

The title comes from a quote of M. H. Abrams in The Mirror and the Lamp (1953): “The change from imitation to expression, and from the mirror to the fountain, the lamp, and related analogies…”, quoted in Sandra Kisters, The Lure of the Biographical. On the (Self-) Representation of Modern Artists, Valiz, 2017.

After 20 years of using myself in my pictures, I felt that I had done all the poses I could possibly do with my body. The way out of this dead end came through Fluxus. In 2016 at my nomination for the Prix Elysée, I started to use Fluxus event scores and other written instructions by artists as the basis of new work. Meaningless Work is a still on-going series. It keeps me curious and allows me to make new discoveries, all while continuing to do what I know best. It enables me to get back both in front and behind the camera. Citing Arthur Köpcke: “People ask: Why? I ask: Why not!”

Elina Brotherus, Bad Camouflage, 2016

From the series Meaningless Work
Pigment ink print on barytha paper from digital original mounted on aluminium and framed
100 x 66 cm
Edition of 6

After 20 years of using myself in my pictures, I felt that I had done all the poses I could possibly do with my body. The way out of this dead end came through Fluxus. In 2016 at my nomination for the Prix Elysée, I started to use Fluxus event scores and other written instructions by artists as the basis of new work. Meaningless Work is a still on-going series. It keeps me curious and allows me to make new discoveries, all while continuing to do what I know best. It enables me to get back both in front and behind the camera. Citing Arthur Köpcke: “People ask: Why? I ask: Why not!”

Elina Brotherus, Black Object, White Chair, 2016

From the series Meaningless Work
Pigment ink print on barytha paper from digital original mounted on aluminium and framed
80 x 53 cm
Edition of 6

After George Brecht, Three arrangements - black object - white chair, 1962

After 20 years of using myself in my pictures, I felt that I had done all the poses I could possibly do with my body. The way out of this dead end came through Fluxus. In 2016 at my nomination for the Prix Elysée, I started to use Fluxus event scores and other written instructions by artists as the basis of new work. Meaningless Work is a still on-going series. It keeps me curious and allows me to make new discoveries, all while continuing to do what I know best. It enables me to get back both in front and behind the camera. Citing Arthur Köpcke: “People ask: Why? I ask: Why not!”

Elina Brotherus, Disobedience, 2018

From the series Meaningless Work
Pigment ink print on barytha paper from digital original mounted on aluminium and framed
90 x 67 cm
Edition of 6

After VALIE EXPORT, Stand up. Sit down., 1989.
In collaboration with VALIE EXPORT

After 20 years of using myself in my pictures, I felt that I had done all the poses I could possibly do with my body. The way out of this dead end came through Fluxus. In 2016 at my nomination for the Prix Elysée, I started to use Fluxus event scores and other written instructions by artists as the basis of new work. Meaningless Work is a still on-going series. It keeps me curious and allows me to make new discoveries, all while continuing to do what I know best. It enables me to get back both in front and behind the camera. Citing Arthur Köpcke: “People ask: Why? I ask: Why not!”

Elina Brotherus, Why Not, 2018

From the series Meaningless Work
Pigment ink print on barytha paper from digital original mounted on aluminium and framed
90 x 112 cm
Edition of 6

After Arthur Köpcke, People ask: Why? I answer: Why not.
From Reading-Work-Piece No 56, 1966

After 20 years of using myself in my pictures, I felt that I had done all the poses I could possibly do with my body. The way out of this dead end came through Fluxus. In 2016 at my nomination for the Prix Elysée, I started to use Fluxus event scores and other written instructions by artists as the basis of new work. Meaningless Work is a still on-going series. It keeps me curious and allows me to make new discoveries, all while continuing to do what I know best. It enables me to get back both in front and behind the camera. Citing Arthur Köpcke: “People ask: Why? I ask: Why not!”