Mark Geffriaud, Grand-bi, 2015

Mark Geffriaud, Grand-bi, 2015

Stereoscope wooden box with lens presented on a window
10 x 18 x 17 cm
Unique

The work shows the door of Mycenae while bringing together two photographs separated by 132 years. This view of the Mycenae door is double for technical reasons but also because it superimposes two gazes, one of Édouard-Alfred Martel, the inventor of speleolo- gy he founded by exploring underground galleries and that of Geffriaud. 132 years later, he went to the same place to find the exact point of view of Martel. Then he moved his camera 6.5 centimeters and photographed the arch. The resulting image is placed beside Martel’s in a stereoscope, an apparatus that gives photography the depth it lacks by allowing the viewer to watch simulatneously two images 6,5 centimeters away from on another, the average gap between two human eyes.

Mark Geffriaud, Grand-bi, 2015

Stereoscope wooden box with lens presented on a window
10 x 18 x 17 cm
Unique

The work shows the door of Mycenae while bringing together two photographs separated by 132 years. This view of the Mycenae door is double for technical reasons but also because it superimposes two gazes, one of Édouard-Alfred Martel, the inventor of speleolo- gy he founded by exploring underground galleries and that of Geffriaud. 132 years later, he went to the same place to find the exact point of view of Martel. Then he moved his camera 6.5 centimeters and photographed the arch. The resulting image is placed beside Martel’s in a stereoscope, an apparatus that gives photography the depth it lacks by allowing the viewer to watch simulatneously two images 6,5 centimeters away from on another, the average gap between two human eyes.

Mark Geffriaud, Grand-bi, 2015

Stereoscope wooden box with lens presented on a window
10 x 18 x 17 cm
Unique

The work shows the door of Mycenae while bringing together two photographs separated by 132 years. This view of the Mycenae door is double for technical reasons but also because it superimposes two gazes, one of Édouard-Alfred Martel, the inventor of speleolo- gy he founded by exploring underground galleries and that of Geffriaud. 132 years later, he went to the same place to find the exact point of view of Martel. Then he moved his camera 6.5 centimeters and photographed the arch. The resulting image is placed beside Martel’s in a stereoscope, an apparatus that gives photography the depth it lacks by allowing the viewer to watch simulatneously two images 6,5 centimeters away from on another, the average gap between two human eyes.