Pratchaya Phinthong, Fork, 2020

Pratchaya Phinthong, Fork, 2020

Polished lead and tin,
40,5 kg 170 x 60 x 1,5 cm
Unique

Laos is one of the most heavily bombed areas in the world. Today, a quarter of the Xieng Khouang Province, where Napia Village is located, is contaminated with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped by US forces during the Secret War in Laos, something that represents a constant threat to the safety of local citizens.

Between 1964 and 1973, over 250 million cluster bombs landed in Laos, thirty percent of which never detonated. Hearing that locals were collecting and melting down these bombs to make spoons to sell to tourists, Pratchaya Phinthong visited Napia.

Moved by the villagers’ transformation of deadly weapons into a tool of nourishment, the artist asked them to collaborate on new products for international trade, thus creating The Spoon Project and Fork, a work commissioned by Tai Kwun Contemporary in Hong Kong.

“I think this is a place where ideas can contribute to productivity by reevaluating what can be recovered from the past to improve contemporary lives.” Pratchaya Phinthong

Pratchaya Phinthong, Fork, 2020

Polished lead and tin,
40,5 kg 170 x 60 x 1,5 cm
Unique

Laos is one of the most heavily bombed areas in the world. Today, a quarter of the Xieng Khouang Province, where Napia Village is located, is contaminated with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped by US forces during the Secret War in Laos, something that represents a constant threat to the safety of local citizens.

Between 1964 and 1973, over 250 million cluster bombs landed in Laos, thirty percent of which never detonated. Hearing that locals were collecting and melting down these bombs to make spoons to sell to tourists, Pratchaya Phinthong visited Napia.

Moved by the villagers’ transformation of deadly weapons into a tool of nourishment, the artist asked them to collaborate on new products for international trade, thus creating The Spoon Project and Fork, a work commissioned by Tai Kwun Contemporary in Hong Kong.

“I think this is a place where ideas can contribute to productivity by reevaluating what can be recovered from the past to improve contemporary lives.” Pratchaya Phinthong

Pratchaya Phinthong, Fork, 2020

Polished lead and tin,
40,5 kg 170 x 60 x 1,5 cm
Unique

Laos is one of the most heavily bombed areas in the world. Today, a quarter of the Xieng Khouang Province, where Napia Village is located, is contaminated with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped by US forces during the Secret War in Laos, something that represents a constant threat to the safety of local citizens.

Between 1964 and 1973, over 250 million cluster bombs landed in Laos, thirty percent of which never detonated. Hearing that locals were collecting and melting down these bombs to make spoons to sell to tourists, Pratchaya Phinthong visited Napia.

Moved by the villagers’ transformation of deadly weapons into a tool of nourishment, the artist asked them to collaborate on new products for international trade, thus creating The Spoon Project and Fork, a work commissioned by Tai Kwun Contemporary in Hong Kong.

“I think this is a place where ideas can contribute to productivity by reevaluating what can be recovered from the past to improve contemporary lives.” Pratchaya Phinthong

Pratchaya Phinthong, Fork, 2020

Polished lead and tin,
40,5 kg 170 x 60 x 1,5 cm
Unique

Laos is one of the most heavily bombed areas in the world. Today, a quarter of the Xieng Khouang Province, where Napia Village is located, is contaminated with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped by US forces during the Secret War in Laos, something that represents a constant threat to the safety of local citizens.

Between 1964 and 1973, over 250 million cluster bombs landed in Laos, thirty percent of which never detonated. Hearing that locals were collecting and melting down these bombs to make spoons to sell to tourists, Pratchaya Phinthong visited Napia.

Moved by the villagers’ transformation of deadly weapons into a tool of nourishment, the artist asked them to collaborate on new products for international trade, thus creating The Spoon Project and Fork, a work commissioned by Tai Kwun Contemporary in Hong Kong.

“I think this is a place where ideas can contribute to productivity by reevaluating what can be recovered from the past to improve contemporary lives.” Pratchaya Phinthong

Pratchaya Phinthong, Fork, 2020

Polished lead and tin,
40,5 kg 170 x 60 x 1,5 cm
Unique

Laos is one of the most heavily bombed areas in the world. Today, a quarter of the Xieng Khouang Province, where Napia Village is located, is contaminated with thousands of unexploded bombs dropped by US forces during the Secret War in Laos, something that represents a constant threat to the safety of local citizens.

Between 1964 and 1973, over 250 million cluster bombs landed in Laos, thirty percent of which never detonated. Hearing that locals were collecting and melting down these bombs to make spoons to sell to tourists, Pratchaya Phinthong visited Napia.

Moved by the villagers’ transformation of deadly weapons into a tool of nourishment, the artist asked them to collaborate on new products for international trade, thus creating The Spoon Project and Fork, a work commissioned by Tai Kwun Contemporary in Hong Kong.

“I think this is a place where ideas can contribute to productivity by reevaluating what can be recovered from the past to improve contemporary lives.” Pratchaya Phinthong