Robert Breer, Floats, 1967–2009

Robert Breer, Floats, 1967–2009

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Porcupine, 1967

Motorized sculpture
Cutted foam, wooden sticks, motor and wheels
51 x 18 x 33 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Borne, 1967

Motorized sculpture
Painted styrofoam, motor and wheels
142 x 18 x 18 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Switz, 1967

Motorized sculpture
Painted styrofoam, motor and wheels
12 x 13 x 60 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Sponge, 2000

Motorized sculpture
Cut foam, motor and wheels Unique
17 x 100 x 37 cm

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Sponge, 2000

Motorized sculpture
Cut foam, motor and wheels
15 x 62 x 65 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Slice, 2008

Motorized sculpture
Painted styrofoam, motor and wheels
19 x 21 x 10 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Silvercup, 2008

Motorized sculpture
Painted styrofoam, motor and wheels
20 x 20,5 x 14,5 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Tucson #1, 2009

Motorized sculpture
Styrofoam painted, motor and wheels
45 x 27,5 x 33,5 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Tucson #2, 2009

Motorized sculpture
Styrofoam painted, motor and wheels
15 x 32 x 23 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Tucson #3, 2009

Motorized sculpture
Styrofoam painted, motor and wheels
62 x 25,5 x 26 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Tucson #4, 2009

Motorized sculpture
Styrofoam painted, motor and wheels 26 x 38 x 26 cm
Unique

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Loaf, 2007

Motorized sculpture
Painted resin, motor and wheels
50 x 34 x 35 cm
Edition of 3

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer

Robert Breer, Tucson 2, 2009

Motorized sculpture with black plastic cover, on motor and wheels
Variable dimensions
Unique

The title “Rug” refers to the soft material used by Robert Breer: Here a black plastic rug that moves and gets distorted thanks to its movement.

The motorized sculptures of Robert Breer - Floats - move extremely slowly, freely, and without logic.They activate the surrounding space as well as structures the timeframe for the spectator.The pieces by Robert Breer acts on our perception, that of our bodies in relation to a physical space illustrates a precise instant: every moment has its memory. In an on-going out-of-picture manner, his sculptures test the thresholds of consciousness and perception. Time and space cannot be disso- ciated from one another: near and far form distance, and before and after form duration. In their ceaseless motion, his sculptures show that the present already no longer exists. Center and periphery become the same. Consequently, the excessively slow movement provokes our memory; their presence becomes traces of recognition—creating an experience of ‘deja vu’. Simultaneously, the sculptures’ autonomy of action captures our attention.After the initial surprise, the spectator is left with the expectation of witnessing their actual journey and the changing of space. The work tests the thresholds of perception and challenges the limits of the definition of ‘sculpture’.The absence of any pedestal and as a result of their move- ment, the rapport between the objects and the floor becomes an active space.

“The reason you might say they’re not kinetic is because they activate the space around them more than they seem to be doing anything themselves.They isolate motion itself. I think that the way I approach film is the opposite but it gets the same results, for instance a film like ‘‘Recreation’’ created static images for all its activity.The activity emphasises its fixity, almost stopping motion by going so fast that it doesn’t exist anymore. It’s anti-kinetic too. So maybe what they have in common is that they are both dealing with thresholds. It’s the thresholds of expe- riencing them ; in one case you’re looking at film which doesn’t move and yet it’s conspiciously active. it has to do with thresholds of definition, in other words, chal- lenging film and challenging sculpture is done by going to the limit of the definition and going past it.”

Robert Breer